February 28, 2016

letobre

For the scene that was taken out of The Crucible I think it is a very important to the play to put it in. It shows the anger of a man who is fearful for his wife’s life, and a teenage girl who is love lust for him. He realizes while talking to her, she will do anything to be with him. However he knows that he needs to fix this or else his wife will hang. So he tells the love lust teenager to snap out of it and realize they just had a moment but that was just it a moment. This would of been important in the play because of the power it has in its meaning we also seen in act two john told his wife Elizabeth he would talk to Abigail, but it left that out we were left to wonder whether he actually went to talk to her or not. This is the scene we all were looking for the mystery was okay but we still needed to know what he wouldof said to her.

February 28, 2016

letobre

The Crucible is a very deep and controversial play, with a very simple mindset that people in the past had. Today we still have some of the same mind set like in act three “If he isn’t with the court he must be counted against it.” We still do this in today’s world if you aren’t fully with a country then you have to be against it. So this sets a very conflicted theme in the play the people are very secretive none of them trust each other. In act one we learn Abigail was caught with Betty and the other girls in the woods naked, which they were trying to do in secret and in that time was a very bad deed a person could do. Mr. Parris says to Abigail “I have been trying to bend these peoples necks to me for three years now.” Why would he need to bend the peoples neck? This creates a sense of distrust throughout the scene. Does he really need to force people to respect him if he is their pastor? In Act One they say the town had three pastors before him. Were they not trust worthy? Were they not respected? The town of Salem is a very methodical place, you give them a reason you’re with the Devil or not “fully” with that community, you are a reject not allowed to live in that town. For this time that wasn’t good to get cast out of a town, because they means you would have to find a new community and gain their trust which was not easy. So a lot of people who were cast out typically would die from not having enough supplies to live through winter. So we can take from the play that the theme is very treacherous theme.

February 28, 2016

Reggmeg

If I were Arthur Miller writing The Crucible, I would not include Act 2, Scene 2 from the play’s appendix. The reason being is that it would take away from the ending scene between John and Elizabeth. As a reader, I got chills reading the end of the play. Although adding this scene would be clarifying for John and Abigail’s relationship, ultimately the end of the play does not need to all be explained. The writing, in the end, leaves chills with the readers because you are left to fill in the blanks yourself. If John Proctor were to confront Abigail, as seen in Act 2, Scene 2 from the play’s appendix, him dying in the last scene would be for more than his dignity and his family. It would look like he was dying to escape the wrath and tangle of Abigail and in a sense not letting her “win” him. By dying and accepting his death, without confronting Abigail, he goes out of the world, like a hero, restoring his good name. As a director, I would rather leave my readers with chills and wanting more than have them be satisfied that they have all of the answers to the story. Sometimes the best stories are left with a little imagination of the mind. Adding in the scene, we would also see an unnecessary side of Abigail. The following quote from John Proctor reiterates this: “I’m told a troop of boys go step for step with you wherever you walk these days.” She has turned into a daft prostitute which is not something that as I director, I would want to be the main focus. I would keep her portrayed with the veneer of an innocent little girl, having a promiscuous side that is hiding from the public. The Crucible has had a tremendous effect on our society and should remain pristine.

February 28, 2016

felijoh

If I were the author of the play I would include the Act 2 Scene 2 of the play. Though the scene might be short it still shows potential of become an interesting scene to be put on. The scene shows that John Proctor still cares about Elizabeth even though he has kept a very dark secret from her and he is trying to somehow persuade Abigail to tell the truth about what really happened. At this point John is doing his best to try and make up for the mistakes that he has done and to try and free Elizabeth from the false accusation that was given to her. In the scene Abigail also tries to do something which is showing John her love for him and that she is trying to get him on her side by telling him how he changed her life and how everyone is just trying to turn him against her. As the scene comes to an end John already made up his mind that he will tell the truth about her if she doesn’t tell the truth, but Abigail is confident that she will try and save him and that she will win him over Elizabeth. Adding the scene would also add a more intense kind of reaction when readers read that part because it is where John finally tells her what kind of a person Abigail really is. In my opinion this scene would add a little for spice to the play because after this scene everything gets serious because the next scene of the play is when they both go to court to testify. What comes next of the scene will determine if Abigail is going to lie or tell the truth to the people of the court and if she is actually going to “save” John.

February 28, 2016

hoephal_crucibleact2scene2

My opinion on Auther Miller’s decision of using Act 2, Scene 2 in The Crucible could swing either way. A lot of emotions were brought up in this scene of John Proctor needlessly urging Abigail to free his wife in court or he will ruin her life, as he knows it. He is not hesitant when saying this and Abigail’s response was not how I would expect it to be. She almost seemed as if she didn’t care that Proctor was going to do so, which is the point that I think she was trying to get across. Making Proctor think that there is no way that he can ruin her life, so she can one up him. This scene gets the readers moving with the vibes that are given off between Abigail and Proctors conversation between one another. Even though The Crucible is most definitely adequate without this scene I feel like it gives the readers more of a better understanding with what is going on between Proctor and Abigail. Proctor says, “You will tell the court you are blind to spirits; you cannot see them or any more, and you will never cry witchery again, or I will make you famous for the whore you are!” At this point Proctor is furious to get what he wishes and for his wife, Elizabeth, to be free. As a reader, we know that Proctor feels guilt for having an affair with Abigail and you can tell in this scene that is shown through his anger. Bringing out the temperamental sides of both Abigail and John Proctor sets a stage for the readers to really see a different side of both of these characters. Their relationship amongst each other riles each other up and without this scene it wouldn’t be as relevant as it in with the scene added to the play.

February 28, 2016

gapprez_The Crucible Act 2 Scene 2

If I were directing the play The Crucible, I would include Act 2 Scene 2 from the play’s appendix. The reason why I would chose to put it in the play is because I believe that it is a powerful scene. It’s powerful in a way where we get to truly see who Abigail is as a person. The tempo of the scene starts off nice and calm, but towards the end all hell breaks loose. She talks about how the town is filled with hypocrites and that she won’t rest until all the hypocrites are gone from this town. John Proctor even comes to the realization that Abigail, is indeed, insane and he also becomes aware of what she is capable of doing. Abigail said, “Oh, how hard it is when pretense falls! But it falls it falls! You have done your duty by her. I hope it is your last hypocrisy. I pray you will come again with sweeter news for me. I know you will- now your duty is done. Good night, John. Fear naught. I will save you tomorrow. From yourself, I will save you.” The affect that this scene would have on the audience would definitely be a powerful one. The audience would realize, like John Proctor, that this girl is twisted and capable of hurting anyone, including herself. They’ll also learn that she thinks of herself so highly and that she’s restless for revenge.  You can just feel the intensity rise up from beginning to end and I feel that it’s necessary for the audience to see.

February 28, 2016

allieli_The Crucible Act II, Scene II

I wouldn’t include Act II, Scene II in the production of The Crucible. Miller wrote this scene after he was finished writing the play, he wanted people to know what happened between Abigail and John, but felt it wasn’t necessary. I don’t think that it is necessary to have in productions, but it is important to read later on so you can get more of a background of what really happened. Removing Act II leaves the readers more suspense, if left us a mystery about who Abigail is and what she did after she accused Elizabeth of witchcraft. In Act II, Scene II Abigail shows us how obsessed she really is with John. She believes that they were meant to be together no matter what, seeing the true colors of Abigail makes her seem more vulnerable than she was before and I don’t think that was what Miller wanted to portray Abigail as. For readers, it is harder to hate Abigail when we know she’s insane and delusional. Without this scene, we can dislike Abigail without any questions because we think she’s just lusting over John. If I included this scene in my production, the authenticity that came in the play previously would be lost. More details is not always better, and that is the case in The Crucible. If this scene was included then people would read and picture Act III and Act IV differently. They would genuinely believe that Abigail’s behavior was okay and that she didn’t have to be punished for it because she was just “insane”. If she was really in love with him, as she says in this scene, would she actually leave him to die when she could just save him? Adding Act II, Scene II would leave readers confused and lacking the magic and gargantuan effect that the end of the play delivers, so I would not include this scene, and I would leave the readers wanting more.

February 28, 2016

mumaand

In my personal opinion of Act 2, Scene 2, I really liked how Miller wrote more about this. It really explains a little bit more about what happens and it seems a little more behind the scenes too. I would want to put this in the play but not right after Act 2. I would do this because I feel as you read from Act 2 to Act 3, you get all the momentum and it builds up and it gets really interesting. I would put this at the very end and title it something like “Flash Back: Act 2, Scene 2” and it would help the reader fill in the gaps that the play may have missed or skipped over if this extra scene wasn’t in there. The Crucible is all about building up the suspense between the acts and it leaves you questioning who did what or how something happened. This extra scene help me personally because it shows John Proctor going and talking to Abigail just like how Elizabeth wanted him to. While John and Abigail are talking alone, he says to her, “If you do not free my wife tomorrow, I am set and bound to ruin you, Abby.” John tells her that he is willing to confess to everything just to ruin her if she doesn’t confess to what she has done. If I were to read this I would come to the conclusion that he is willing to do anything for his wife to save her because of what he started. John tells Abigail to say how she is blind to the spirits and that she can’t see them anymore, and that she will never accuse anybody of witchery ever again. I feel like because of what John Proctor says to Abigail in this scene, this has to be put in the end so you get a true understanding of everything that goes on. It is a way of tying up loose ends and I would put this Act 2, Scene 2 at the end of Act 3.

February 28, 2016

Arnolog

I would not include act two scene two in a production of The Crucible. Its not that I disliked the scene, I enjoyed reading it and thought it was cool that there was another scene available. My problem is that I feel like this scene kind of spoiled a little bit of what happens in act three, taking away a little of tension and “oh my god” effect felt by the audiance when he confronts Abigail in the court house. If I was at a production of  The Crucible and it transitioned from “act two scene one”, to “act two scene two”, then to “act three” instead of just going from “act two” to “act three” it would probably loose some of the effect the play had on it’s audience (myself) because it kind of eases the reader/viewer (me) into whats to come in act three instead of just thrusting you right into the middle of it. If I’m gonna nitpick (which I have too to make this anywhere close to 300 words) I would say that along with slightly lowering the speed of this emotional rollercoaster this second scene also breaks up The Crucibles’s flow, a second scene to the second act when all the other acts where one part kind of makes the scene awkward and clunky in the context of all the other acts to the play being one scene. This scene could have found good use in The Crucible if the play was a little bit longer and a little slower burning. I am curious though if there where any other additional scenes that did not manage to make their way into the final cut of the play because (I was very surprised by this) I enjoyed reading this play.

February 28, 2016

gialste

If I were the director of the play I would add Act 2 scene 2 because I think that it would be good for the play. If you that part into it, it add another huge dilemma talking about how Abigail thinks that John Proctor still loves her but John Proctor knows that he will get in trouble so he doesn’t want anything to do with her. Abigail won’t quit so I think that it would make a good addition in the play because then it could also change the ending by a lot maybe Elizabeth wouldn’t be getting in trouble because John Proctor would be busy dealing with Abigail and her weird love for a old man. Act 2 scene 2 I think would sort of fuel the play and make it to where there were more mysteries and it could branch off and make the play I think even better than it already is. If they would have added that part of the play I bet there would be conflict between Elizabeth and Abigail. I wouldn’t be sure if Elizabeth’s character makes a big fuss about it and bring it to the public or if she would sort of tell him that he needs to stop his sickness or else she will break with him. The end of the play would be different probably because I think that Elizabeth would find out about their relationship and then she would break up with him. So then only John Proctor would have been the only would to sin an Elizabeth wouldn’t have gotten in any trouble at the very end for committing purgery.